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Sputter Deposition

Sputter deposition is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method of thin film deposition by sputtering. This involves ejecting material from a “target” that is a source onto a “substrate” such as a silicon wafer. Resputtering is re-emission of the deposited material during the deposition process by ion or atom bombardment. Sputtered atoms ejected from the target have a wide energy distribution, typically up to tens of eV (100,000 K). The sputtered ions (typically only a small fraction of the ejected particles are ionized — on the order of 1 percent) can ballistically fly from the target in straight lines and impact energetically on the substrates or vacuum chamber (causing resputtering). Alternatively, at higher gas pressures, the ions collide with the gas atoms that act as a moderator and move diffusively, reaching the substrates or vacuum chamber wall and condensing after undergoing a random walk. The entire range from high-energy ballistic impact to low-energy thermalized motion is accessible by changing the background gas pressure. The sputtering gas is often an inert gas such as argon. For efficient momentum transfer, the atomic weight of the sputtering gas should be close to the atomic weight of the target, so for sputtering light elements neon is preferable, while for heavy elements krypton or xenon are used. Reactive gases can also be used to sputter compounds. The compound can be formed on the target surface, in-flight or on the substrate depending on the process parameters. The availability of many parameters that control sputter deposition make it a complex process, but also allow experts a large degree of control over the growth and microstructure of the film.

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For many applications, such as OLED, OPV and OTFT research, and graphene and 2D materials, samples are sensitive to oxygen and moisture and handling within inert environments is a must. In these cases, deposition tools must allow for transfer to and from glovebox enclosures with controlled inert atmospheres. In addition to vacuum deposition, Moorfield can also equip glovebox-integrated tools with other hardware such as etching (including soft-etching) and annealing components.
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For many applications, such as OLED, OPV and OTFT research, and graphene and 2D materials, samples are sensitive to oxygen and moisture and handling within inert environments is a must. In these cases, deposition tools must allow for transfer to and from glovebox enclosures with controlled inert atmospheres. In addition to vacuum deposition, Moorfield can also equip glovebox-integrated tools with other hardware such as etching (including soft-etching) and annealing components.
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μ-650c systems tools take the modular concept to the pilot-scale level. Large chambers allow for increased-size component sets for coating large areas, and a range of load-lock options enable high-throughput operation. At the same time, systems are fully customisable to match specific applications.
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μ-570c systems have front-loading box-type chambers ideal for multiple-source magnetron sputtering but also thermal and e-beam evaporation.μ-570c  systems are glovebox-compatible for atmosphere-sensitive applications.μ-570c  systems offer tall chambers ideally suited for thermal, LTE and e-beam evaporation techniques requiring longer working distances for optimum uniformity.
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μ-450c systems have front-loading box-type chambers ideal for multiple-source magnetron sputtering but also thermal and e-beam evaporation.μ-450c  systems are glovebox-compatible for atmosphere-sensitive applications.
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